I choose feminism over racism.

Arab women met on Thursday in Jordan to warn that religious fundamentalism poses a threat to women’s rights. As Ayaan says, “Radical Islam will be defeated by the emancipation of women.”

A very interesting article for all my feminist followers.

It is time for those who love liberal democracy to join hands with Islam’s reformists. Here is a clue to who’s who: Moderate Muslims denounce violence committed in the name of Islam but insist that religion has nothing to do with it; reformist Muslims, by contrast, not only deplore Islamist violence but admit that our religion is used to incite it.

Please read the whole article by extraordinary lesbian feminist and Canadian Muslim Irshad Manji before reacting to the quote above. I cannot wait for her new book, Allah, Liberty & Love.

If you feel too lazy to read a whole article, on the link there are also 3 short videos you should make sure to watch.

Noor Al-Maleki’s murder was without honor, Steinle said. She was like any other 20-year-old woman whose desire for independence caused tension with her parents. Her father reacted with hatred rather than understanding, Steinle said.

He recounted lessons from Buddhism, Islam and Christianity, which preach forgiveness and compassion.

"For someone to say this crime was committed to restore someone’s honor, they really do not understand what religion is all about," Steinle said.

When I first read about Noor Al-Maleki I simply broke into tears. I am glad the father will have some time to think about what he’s done and question the concept of honor and shame that is unfortunately so prevalent back in his home country. 

If you read this, please have a minute of silence for Noor Al-Maleki.

On progressives and Islam

brad-t:

I’m always caught off guard by the support that Islam gets from liberals/progressives, when the tenets of Islam and the ways Muslims live today are very conservative in nature. Islamic societies are societies where women are stripped of their sexual and medical rights and treated as second-class citizens, where facts are ignored in favour of holy words, where conflicts are solved not by debates and concessions but by violence, where the poor are continuously exploited and deprived of opportunities and knowledge.

I understand the defense, though; Muslims and Middle Easterners in general are exploited and discriminated against by the “first world” and, in particular, there have been various military atrocities committed against them by America and Israel. However, we have to be able to draw the line between protecting innocent people and their freedom vs. protecting their backwards, harmful ideologies.

Modern Islam is conservative extremism.

*(Islam as it is in the world today, I don’t want any ridiculous culture vs. religion arguments)

Thank you, thank you, thank you. That said, I not only hope that my fellow Leftists go back on the track of protecting all women (not making an exception to certain cases because they happen to be Muslim, which to me is racism), but I also hope for more Muslims like The Fatal Feminist.

lavidaescorta:

carefreewhitegirl:

Anonymous asked:I keep seeing this photo around Tumblr and I’d like to see what you think of it: CFWG, or something more? Personally I’m torn. I think the photo stands to make an important comment, however when re-posted with comments like “The woman on the right is more oppressed”, I think people are taking it a step too far. The photo itself doesn’t ask who is more oppressed, it just places the two women side by side in a very interesting and though provoking manner.
She is and she isn’t. If I understand correctly, the point of her being blindfolded is to highlight just how ill-informed westerners are about islam. The figure’s blindness is a metaphor for the western world. And her naked body represents the embarrassment we should feel from our ignorance. I suppose you could also view it with a CFWG lens: here’s this chick who is blindfolded because she doesn’t care to see the rest of the world. Regardless,  I don’t find it particularly evocative or interesting, so, I dunno.

 I think it’s interesting how they’re inversions of each other. The Muslim woman is completely covered except her eyes, and the Western woman is uncovered and exposed except for her eyes.
Random tangent, but it reminds me of that song, Just a Girl by No Doubt: “Take this pink ribbon off my eyes; I’m exposed, and it’s no big surprise.”
I think this can definitely be a depiction of the issues of both, maybe even a sort of common basis for both cultures because both, in their own way, oppress women. Women in the West are told to be free and “allowed” to a certain degree to flout and embrace their sexuality, but they will still be judged and our society will maintain a sort of ignorance over them, this Western lens that completely blinds them to other ways of life, faith, thinking they’re free when really they’re still facing objectification and undermined for their sexuality.
Whereas, on the other hand, the Muslim woman is completely covered, discouraged from showing her body, taught that it is indecent because it tempts men and that her honor comes from keeping it concealed. She can see, but it’s still through the lens of her culture, and she can’t speak out about what she does see. I also think it illustrates the way they see each other based on how both cultures view womanhood and sexuality as well as tradition. Where a Muslim women might see Western women as being sexualized and dehumanized or even blindly participating in their own oppression, Western women may overlook the identity of a Muslim woman and see only an oppressed person hidden from the world and given no identity, regardless of if her garb is meaningful her, chosen, or not. Both, if biased by their own culture, would probably see the other as forced or coerced to make such dress decisions rather than making their own for their own reasons. Both are in the public eye, being looked on, being judged by others. Heh, the fact that people make value judgments on who’s more oppressed could actually be interpreted as a nasty attitude the picture is exposing. Bodies turned political and stripped of identity and autonomy.
So there’s bias in both directions really, and a message of institutional oppression in different forms as perceived by opposite parties. Pretty thought-provoking picture, I would say, and clearly controversial in its complexity.

Excellent commentary.

lavidaescorta:

carefreewhitegirl:

Anonymous asked:I keep seeing this photo around Tumblr and I’d like to see what you think of it: CFWG, or something more? Personally I’m torn. I think the photo stands to make an important comment, however when re-posted with comments like “The woman on the right is more oppressed”, I think people are taking it a step too far. The photo itself doesn’t ask who is more oppressed, it just places the two women side by side in a very interesting and though provoking manner.

She is and she isn’t. If I understand correctly, the point of her being blindfolded is to highlight just how ill-informed westerners are about islam. The figure’s blindness is a metaphor for the western world. And her naked body represents the embarrassment we should feel from our ignorance. I suppose you could also view it with a CFWG lens: here’s this chick who is blindfolded because she doesn’t care to see the rest of the world. Regardless,  I don’t find it particularly evocative or interesting, so, I dunno.

 I think it’s interesting how they’re inversions of each other. The Muslim woman is completely covered except her eyes, and the Western woman is uncovered and exposed except for her eyes.

Random tangent, but it reminds me of that song, Just a Girl by No Doubt: “Take this pink ribbon off my eyes; I’m exposed, and it’s no big surprise.”

I think this can definitely be a depiction of the issues of both, maybe even a sort of common basis for both cultures because both, in their own way, oppress women. Women in the West are told to be free and “allowed” to a certain degree to flout and embrace their sexuality, but they will still be judged and our society will maintain a sort of ignorance over them, this Western lens that completely blinds them to other ways of life, faith, thinking they’re free when really they’re still facing objectification and undermined for their sexuality.

Whereas, on the other hand, the Muslim woman is completely covered, discouraged from showing her body, taught that it is indecent because it tempts men and that her honor comes from keeping it concealed. She can see, but it’s still through the lens of her culture, and she can’t speak out about what she does see. I also think it illustrates the way they see each other based on how both cultures view womanhood and sexuality as well as tradition. Where a Muslim women might see Western women as being sexualized and dehumanized or even blindly participating in their own oppression, Western women may overlook the identity of a Muslim woman and see only an oppressed person hidden from the world and given no identity, regardless of if her garb is meaningful her, chosen, or not. Both, if biased by their own culture, would probably see the other as forced or coerced to make such dress decisions rather than making their own for their own reasons. Both are in the public eye, being looked on, being judged by others. Heh, the fact that people make value judgments on who’s more oppressed could actually be interpreted as a nasty attitude the picture is exposing. Bodies turned political and stripped of identity and autonomy.

So there’s bias in both directions really, and a message of institutional oppression in different forms as perceived by opposite parties. Pretty thought-provoking picture, I would say, and clearly controversial in its complexity.

Excellent commentary.

[…] Note to non-Muslims: Dare to ruin the romance of the moment. Open societies remain open because people take the risk of asking questions — out loud. Questions like, “Why is it so easy to draw thousands of Muslims into the streets to denounce France’s limited ban on the hijab, but impossible to draw even a fraction of those demonstrators into the streets to protest Saudi Arabia’s wholesale imposition of the hijab?” And when Muslims insist, “We’re democracies in our own way,” they need to hear this question posed: “What rights do women and religious minorities exercise in such democracies — not in theory, but in actuality?” No doubt, among the responses you’ll get is that the West should take a hard hard look at how it’s mutilating women through breast implant and tummy tucks for the sake of social acceptance. Agreed, the West should look hard. Still, in all my years as a feminist in the West, I’ve never met a girl whose parents have disowned her because she wouldn’t inject silicon into her boobs — and yet more than a few Muslim parents have rejected their daughters for resisting clitoral circumcision. Non-Muslims do the world no favors by pushing the moral mute button as soon as Muslims start speaking. Dare to ruin the moment.
Irshad Manji, The Trouble With Islam Today. An excellent lesbian Muslim author and journalist.

Munir Al-Hakim, 30, at the Isleworth Crown Court, received a six month prison sentence — suspended for two years. He also received a 12 month restraining order and was ordered to complete 225 hours community service.

That’s it? I bet this woman is still terrified. I hope she’s safe. 

I am still on hiatus (though I’m starting to feel better), but when I received this email notification of a Facebook message, I just had to pass by and share it with you.
I won’t take any sexism, “”justified”” by a Christian, Muslim, Jew God or not. We don’t need to be “protected” if there is no one to be protected from. So it’s up to men to stop raping and murdering, not up to us to hide and cover ourselves up. And it is up to us and us alone to choose our “roles”. Up in his ass with his disgusting sexist message.

I am still on hiatus (though I’m starting to feel better), but when I received this email notification of a Facebook message, I just had to pass by and share it with you.

I won’t take any sexism, “”justified”” by a Christian, Muslim, Jew God or not. We don’t need to be “protected” if there is no one to be protected from. So it’s up to men to stop raping and murdering, not up to us to hide and cover ourselves up. And it is up to us and us alone to choose our “roles”. Up in his ass with his disgusting sexist message.

A progressive, 21st-century translation — in English. The U.S. publisher bailed on it after the Prophet Muhammad cartoon riots. But fear didn’t stop the translators. 

I haven’t read it, but I was wondering what Muslims and Atheists thought about that? Any opinions? 

Just look at how Tunisian women stood side-by-side with Tunisian men. They came out to the streets to protest in headscarves. They came out in miniskirts. It doesn’t matter. They were there.
Lawyer Bilel Larbi